Our network

Schools

State’s report cards show MMSD meets expectations

State education officials say the majority of Wisconsin public schools and school districts meet or exceed expectations for student achievement.

The Madison Metropolitan School District was rated at 69.8, which is meeting expectations. That score is an improvement over last year’s score of 68.5.

While Madison remained in the bottom third of districts statewide, it moved up from 11th to eighth among districts located in cities.

“As a school district, we’ve been very focused on the school improvement process. That means tightening up the process by which we set measurable goals for them to choose a few powerful strategies for meeting those goals and then consistently monitoring them along the way so they can make adjustments,” MMSD Superintendent Jennifer Cheatham said. “We believe this is how you raise student achievement to narrow achievement gaps.”

Hippie Christmas prompts bed bug, insect discussion

Hippie Christmas prompts bed bug, insect discussion

The yearly chaos when students move out of their current apartments and into their apartments for the next year is happening in downtown Madison the next couple of days.

Leases for apartments turn over Thursday into Friday, and the massive move means Hippie Christmas on many downtown streets near campus.

Students are dumping what they don't want on the curb, which is everything from TVs and school supplies to old furniture.

Officials with the Tenant Resource Center are urging people to be mindful of bed bugs and other insects when picking up stuff off the street.

"Tenants are always very concerned they're going to be charged a thousand bucks for the heat treatment (to get rid of bed bugs)," said Anders Zanichkowsky, program director of the Tenant Resource Center. "Landlords are very concerned that if the tenant doesn't report it, it's going to spread to all their units before they even know about it."

Madison neighbors seek school district switch

Erika Dean's son Aiden went to daycare in McFarland. He grew up going to the grocery store in town. He has friends there. He plays on McFarland sports teams.

However, district lines snake right around Liberty Place where Dean lives, putting Aiden in Madison schools. When she applied for open enrollment, Aiden was put on the waiting list.

When she went through the same process for her daughter, Adelene, Dean was able to get her in. She attends 4K in Conrad Elvehjam Early Learning Center in McFarland, while her brother goes to first grade at Glendale Elementary in Madison.

Dean said she's happy with Madison schools, but after spending the school year with two drop offs, two pick ups, two daycares, and two different school calendars, it comes down to convenience.

National, city, school leaders to focus on out-of-school-time programs

National, city, school leaders to focus on out-of-school-time programs

Local education groups and leaders will be holding meetings to discuss the most effective ways that Madison can help families work with providers, schools and the local government for the well-being of children, according to a release.

The city of Madison, the Madison Metropolitan School District and Madison Out-of-School Time will be hosting community conversations about family involvement with Madison's out-of-school-time programs, officials said.

Madison is one of 14 cities selected by the National League of Cities to partner with the U.S. Department of Education to hold community conversations with educators, parents and community leaders, according to the release.

Parenting workshop offers doctor's advice on topics from bullying to teen alcohol use

Parenting workshop offers doctor's advice on topics from bullying to teen alcohol use

Raising healthy, happy kids is no easy task, which is why Dean Clinic is again joining forces with area educators and community leaders for Parent University.

The 2014 Parent University will take place March 15 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Rome Corners Intermediate School, at 1111 S. Perry Parkway in Oregon.

Parent University is free for families with kids of all ages. 

Official: Extreme cold closes MMSD schools Monday

Official: Extreme cold closes MMSD schools Monday

An official announced Friday afternoon that Madison Metropolitan School District Schools would be closed Monday. 

MMSD spokeswoman Rachel Strauch-Nelson said just before 5 p.m. that all school buildings would be closed Monday due extreme weather conditions.

The Madison School and Community Recreation department activities, athletics and other extra-curriculars scheduled Monday were also canceled.

The district said said a decision about school Tuesday had not yet been made, and families with children attending MMSD schools should monitor local media and email for Tuesday's status. 

For additional area announcements, visit the cold weather announcements page on Channel3000.com.

RELATED: 

Live blog: Brutal bitter cold

Dozens watch anti-bullying film at library

More than 40 people showed up to watch the documentary "Bully" downtown at the Madison Central Library on West Mifflin Street Wednesday.

"Bully" is a powerful and provocative film that follows the lives of five kids who are bullied every day. Its message is that the culture of our schools is broken and needs to change.

The film resonated with many viewers, bringing some close to tears, who discussed the film after the 6:30 p.m. showing. The dialogue was moderated by News 3 Anchor Susan Siman as part of WISC-TV's year-long "Time for Kids Buddy Project" to fight bullying.

Eleven-year-old Terriana Brown said the movie hit close to home for her.  

""I might cry right now," Brown said. "It feels like it's me that is on the screen."